SEEDS Scholars, faculty and guest bloggers write about their questions, experiences, and, you guessed it, their discoveries as they explore sustainability issues far and near. 

Things Unseen....and What's Coming Up This Spring

Things Unseen....and What's Coming Up This Spring
Cover image: Branching Pattern 1, © Paul Merryman 2003, www.paulmerrymanart.com. It’s good to be periodically reminded that the visible world of life as we know it is only a small slice of reality, resting upon universes of interrelated processes normally hidden from view.  Take food for example. The act of eating is but a moment in an ongoing cycle of highly complex interactions.  The dark depths of soil where seeds first awaken are teeming with life.  A single teaspoon of rich garden soil contains about a billion bacteria, several yards of branching mycelial threads, thousands of protozoa, and hundreds of beneficial nematodes! ...
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Borders: Bringing the Environment Home

Borders: Bringing the Environment Home
Most of us put a lot of thought and effort into how we can be happier and healthier. And many of us also make efforts to help out the planet, too. But why do we prioritize them so differently? Why will we always eat when we're hungry or put on a sweatshirt when we're cold, but we only recycle or remember our reusable grocery bags when it's convenient for us? As you've probably heard, Hiram's ethics theme this year is Borders. As SEED (Sustainability, Environment, and Engaged Design) Scholars, we're interested in the border we all create between the responsibility we...
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Building Community Resilience Through the Arts

Building Community Resilience Through the Arts
This is part three of a three-part series by Hiram students writing about community resilience and what they're doing and learning as they explore the concept.    Authors: Molly Jukes and Jasmine Ransom  The science of how to do the technical parts of community development is well understood—how to build water infrastructure, housing units, transportation systems—but we...have forgotten about the ‘people’ part of the equation.  How do we build places where people actually want to live their lives?  How do we build strong social ties?  The secret partially lies in the arts.             Ben Hecht, Living Cities        This Spring 3-week, Hiram College offered...
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Working to Learn

Working to Learn
This is part two of a three-part series by Hiram students writing about community resilience and what they're doing and learning as they explore the concept.   Authors: Jonah Lynd-Porter and Mike Skizenta  One of the themes of building community resilience we have been focusing on is re-skilling: the teaching and learning of timeless, practical, and increasingly endangered skills.  Re-skilling is important for ensuring that communities are able to provide for their basic needs, but also because knowing how to do stuff is just plain satisfying and fun!  To this end, our class spent a day at Kelly’s Working Well Farm (KWW) in Chagrin Falls. For three years...
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A Day on The Farm, A Lifetime of Skills

A Day on The Farm, A Lifetime of Skills
This is part one of a three-part series by Hiram students writing about community resilience and what they're doing and learning as they explore the concept.   Authors: Michelle Picciano and Jordan Everett  About an hour outside of Cleveland, Ohio are vast amounts of land that will make you forget that you are just a drive from the bustling city and its suburbs. Whether this may seem daunting or picturesque is up to you, for the six students of an environmental studies class taught by Professor Debbie Kasper called “Building Community Resilience,” this was the perfect setting to put our new knowledge to work and...
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