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New Year, New You

New Year, New You

 

With the holidays behind us and a new year in front of us, what better time to commit to improving your overall health than the present?  We all enjoyed the fudge, cookies, egg nog and parties to the point of needing to wear our yoga pants back to work this week!  But, let’s not get hung up on a new year’s commitment.  Instead, why not break it down into smaller, more manageable time frames that will lend itself to a better chance of sticking to your resolutions?

As we, at the Health Center, focus on your overall health this year with the emphasis on 3FOUR50, there are three lifestyle choices: tobacco use, poor diet (including harmful use of alcohol) and lack of physical activity, that contribute to four chronic diseases: heart disease, Type 2 Diabetes, lung disease and some cancers, which in turn, contribute to more than fifty percent of preventable deaths in the world, we want to share with you three of the top ten resolutions people make and quickly break.

 

  • Eat Healthier
  • Exercise More
  • Quit Smoking

 

While we all want to improve on our health, trying to tackle too many changes at one time will only set you up for failure.  Try to choose one thing you want to improve on this week. Say it out loud.  Write it down.  Set an end time.  Having an end date will give you a sense of accomplishment.

If you want to eat healthier, make one change this week.  Cut out soda, avoid the vending machine, skip dessert.  Do this for one week and then commit to doing it for another week with an additional change in your diet.  Build upon small changes that will give you great results.

If you want to exercise more, take the steps everyday instead of the elevator.  Take a walk on your lunch break, do jumping jacks on the commercial breaks while watching your favorite show.  Build on your fitness routine by trying a new exercise every week.  You never know what you might find you really enjoy doing!

If you want to quit smoking, try cutting back on your average daily number of cigarettes.  Choose a healthy alternative to distract you when you crave a cigarette.  Inquire online about smoking cessation programs (link below).  Find a partner to hold each other accountable one week at a time until you are both smoke-free.

Now what?! What do you want to accomplish?  Choose one thing that will make a positive impact on your health.  Take small steps and set weekly goals that are attainable.  But, the first step is to say it out loud and write it down!

 

Smoking cessation link:

http://www.lung.org/about-us/our-impact/top-stories/five-secrets-for-quitting.html

 

 

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Marjorie Billock is a Registered Nurse at the Hiram College Health Center.

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