Michelle Nario-Redmond, Ph.D.

Professor of PsychologyMichelle Nario-Redmond at her desk


B.A., University of Tulsa
M.A., Ph.D., Kansas University


330-569-5230
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Website: http://nario-redmond.socialpsychology.org/


Michelle Reyna Nario-Redmond is Chair of the Faculty, and Professor of Psychology specializing in stereotyping and prejudice and disability studies. Her research focuses on disability identification and political advocacy; strategies for coping with prejudice; persisting with disabilities on campus; and the unintended consequences of simulating disability. Some of her work is published in Basic and Applied Psychology, British Journal of Social Psychology, Emerging Adulthood, Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Perspectives on Psychological Science, Self and Identity, and Social Cognition. She has also contributed chapters to Wiley-Blackwell’s Handbook of Positive Psychological Interventions and AHEAD’s Disabled Faculty and Staff in a Disabling Society. Her courses include social and personality psychology, stereotyping, research methods, human diversity, ageism and ableism. In 2010, she received the Vencl Carr for Teaching Excellence, and enjoys collaborating with students on independent research. She is passionate about social justice, Universal Design for Learning, and increasing access to higher education. Most recently, Nario-Redmond participated in the APA’s Leadership Institute and Women with Disabilities in STEM Education Project. She serves on the board of Hattie Larlham, an agency working to increase the employment and inclusion of children and adults with disabilities. In collaboration with her daughter Ceara, Nario-Redmond developed a school-based intervention to raise awareness of disability culture. Finally, she is working on her first book, Ableism: The Causes and Consequences of Disability Prejudice, to be published in the Contemporary Social Issues Series for the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues.

Education

  • Ph.D., Social Psychology, Quantitative Concentration, GPA 4.0/4.0, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS. 1996
  • Graduate, Summer Institute in Political Psychology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH. 1995
  • M.A., Social Psychology, The University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS. 1992
  • B.A., Communications, Magna Cum Laude. The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK. 1986

Classes Taught

  • Independent Research: Unintended Consequences of Disability Simulations
  • Independent Research: Inspiration as a Source of Paternalistic Prejudice and Helping
  • Independent Research: Humor as Positive Intervention to Reduce College Stress
  • Independent Research: Social Identity as a Foundation for Positive Interventions
  • Independent Research: Synthesizing and Extending Disability Prejudice Research
  • Independent Research: Emerging Adulthood Project
  • Senior Seminar
  • Social Psychology
  • Experimental Methods and Statistics
  • Seminar in Abnormal Psychology
  • Gimpy Geezers
  • General Psychology 
  • Freshman Colloquium: Freak, Gimp, Crazy, Crip
  • Personality Psychology
  • Stereotyping and Prejudice
  • Psychology and Film
  • Marginalized Voices of Mexico and Central America
  • MAIS Social Construction of Human Variability

Areas of Interest

  • Ableism: The Causes and Consequences of Disability Prejudice. Measuring Stereotype Consensus and Change.
  • Predicting College Student Academic Outcomes: Individual Differences and Self-Regulation. 
  • Minority Group Identity Development, Strategic Coping and Well-Being Disability/Diversity Awareness Interventions and Evaluation.
  • Universally-Designed Pedagogy.

Professional Experience

  • Faculty Chair, Hiram College. August 2015 - July 2017
  • Professor, Department of Psychology, Hiram College. August 2016 - Present
  • Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, Hiram College. August 2011 - July 2016
  • Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Hiram College. August 2009 - August 2011
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Hiram College. August 2007 - August 2009
  • Faculty Research Advisor, Department of Psychology, Reed College. January 2006 - May, 2006
  • Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology, Reed College. August 2002 - July 2005
  • Evaluation Research Coordinator, Center On Urban Poverty and Social Change, Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences, Case Western Reserve University. March 1997 - July 2002
  • Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Psychology, The University of Kansas. July 1994 - July 1996
  • Instructor - Social Psychology, Department of Psychology, The University of Kansas. June 1992 - August 1992. August 1993 - May 1994

Publications

  • Nario-Redmond, M. R. & Oleson, K. C. (2016). Disability group identification, disability-rights advocacy and political attitudes: Contingencies among emerging and other adults. Emerging Adulthood, 4(3), 207-218.DOI: 10.1177/2167696815579830
  • Lindly, O., Nario-Redmond, M. R., & Noel, J. G. (2014). Creatively re-defining fat: Identification predicts strategic responses to stigma, ingroup attitudes, and well-being. Fat Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society, 3(2), 179-195. DOI 10.1090/21604851.2014.865968Ball, T. C., &
  • Nario-Redmond, M. R. (2014). Positive social identity interventions: Finding a conduit for well-being in members of stigmatized groups. In Parks, A. C. & Schueller, S. (Eds.), The Wiley-Blackwell handbook of positive psychological interventions. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Nario-Redmond, M.R., Noel, J. G, & Fern, E. (2013). Redefining disability, reimagining the self:  Disability identification predicts self-esteem and strategic responses to stigma. Self and Identity. DOI:10.1080/15298868.2012.681118
  • Nario-Redmond, M.R., Noel, J. G, & Fern, E. (in press). Redefining disability, reimagining the self:
    Disability identification predicts self-esteem and strategic responses to stigma. Self and Identity. DOI:10.1080/15298868.2012.681118
  • Grahe, J. E., Reifman, A., Herman, A., Walker, M., Oleson, K. C., Nario-Redmond, M., & Wiebe, R. P. (2012). Harnessing the undiscovered resource of student research projects. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7, 605. DOI: 10.1177/1745691612459057 http://pps.sagepub.com/content/7/6/605.full.pdf+html
  • Nario-Redmond, M. R., & Oleson, K. C. (2011). Simi Linton. In Stange, M. Z., Oyster, C. K., and Golson, J. G (Eds.), The Multimedia Encyclopedia of Women in Today's World. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
  • Nario-Redmond, M.R. (2010). Cultural stereotypes of disabled and non-disabled men and women: Consensus for global category representations and diagnostic domains. British Journal of Social Psychology, 49, 471-488.
  • Biernat, M., Ma, J., & Nario-Redmond, M.R. (2008). Standards to suspect and diagnose stereotypical traits. Social Cognition, 26 (3), 288-313.
  • Molloy, E., & Nario-Redmond, M.R. (2007). College faculty perceptions of learning disabled students: Stereotypes, group identity and bias. In M. Vance (Ed.), Disabled faculty and staff in a disabling society: Multiple identities in higher education. Huntersville, NC: Association on Higher Education and Disability.
  • Nario-Redmond, M.R., Biernat, M., Eidelman, S., & Palenske, D. J. (2004). The social and personal identities scale: A measure of the differential importance ascribed to social and personal self-categorizations. Self and Identity, 3, 143-175.

 

Disability Prejudice Narratives Consent

 

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