Hiram College
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Hiram junior Joseph Rozalski, a double major in physics and computer science, recently presented his research titled “All-or-none folding of polymer arrays” at the American Physical Society, Ohio Region, 2016 Fall Meeting held at Bowling Green State University.

Hiram junior Joseph Rozalski, a double major in physics and computer science, recently presented his research titled “All-or-none folding of polymer arrays” at the American Physical Society, Ohio Region, 2016 Fall Meeting held at Bowling Green State University.

Rozalski worked as a research assistant this past summer to Mark Taylor, Ph.D., associate professor of physics.

Dr. Taylor, who says that the research he did in his own undergraduate studies has had a lasting impact on him, encourages his students to participate in experiential learning.

“I am an active research scientist and, in my 15 years at Hiram, I have worked very hard to engage students in my research.  I am committed to giving my students the opportunity to really ‘do science’ here at Hiram.  I have had a number of students coauthor papers with me and all of my research students have presented their work at professional scientific conferences,” says Dr. Taylor.

Rozalski was accompanied at the conference by Dr. Taylor, also spoke at the meeting. His talk, “Polymer folding in confined and crowded environments,” was coauthored by another Hiram junior and physics major, Christopher Vinici.

The research by Rozalski, Vinici and Dr.Taylor was conducted through computer simulation studies. Their findings may be applied to develop new types of materials with variable scientific properties.

This research was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation.