Hui-Chu Ying: Prayers

January 22-February 29, 2008


Hui-Chu Ying uses her artistic interests to address the challenges of war, disasters, illness, intolerance, and loss. Marshalling a variety of media such as painting, drawing, etching, screen-printing and collage, she creates large-scale installations that offer a space for meditation and communication.

Hui-Chu is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Akron's Myers School of Art.



" We learn to nurture and embrace one another, to cope with the loss of loved ones, and to endure obstacles. The best medicine for healing the wounds that life throws at us is the offer of hope and courage. Helping one another to develop empathy, tolerance, patience and humility is one of life's greatest gifts."
- Hui-Chu Ying

In conjunction with the exhibition, Hiram College presents the symposium, Creative Coping: Art as Sustenance

Wednesday, February 6, 2008, 6-8 p.m.

Featured Speakers:

Becky Wellman '93, PhD, MT-BC/DT
Board Certified Music Therapist
Educational Psychologist, Developmental Specialist
"One Moment in Time: Harnessing the Power of Music"

Paul Nietupski, Ph.D.
Dept of Religious Studies, John Carroll University
Scholar of Asian Religions and Cultures
"Buddhism, Therapy, and Art"

Lynn Underwood, Ph.D.
Professor of Biomedical Humanities, Hiram College
Specialist in Spirituality, Disability, and End-of-Life Issues
"Visual Art and the Human Person in Dire Circumstances"

Related events on the Hiram College campus:

  • Student directed production of Laramie Project by Moises Kaufman.
  • Lectures in Religion Series, featuring Philip Clayton, Ingraham Chair, Claremont School of Theology and Professor of Philosophy and Religion at the Claremont Graduate University. Topic: "Why the 'New Atheism' Isn't New: The Path from Scientific Reductionism to Reenchantment"
  • Shiva Sastry, playing the Veena, traditional South Indian music
  • Ethics Symposium: Talk by Barry Lopez, author of About this Life, on "The Storyteller's Obligation"
  • Professors Kim King and Betsy Bauman on the stories behind quilts.
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