Hiram College
Megan Altman, Ph.D. Photo

Megan Altman, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Philosophy
Pre-Law Advisor

Megan Altman is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy specializing in 19th and 20th Century Continental Philosophy, Phenomenology, and Ethics (broadly construed). Her research explores different ways of thinking through contemporary experiences and issues of uprootedness and the loss of meaning, and reckons with questions concerning commitment, existential identity, community, authenticity, gender, race, faith, and the significance of death. She approaches teaching as a core component of academic life that calls for emotional vulnerability, a steadfast commitment to intellectual excellence, and openness to difference. Her goal is to awaken students to the importance of thinking hard about life, about what they have learned, and about their place in the world.

Education

  • B.A., University of South Florida
  • M.A., University of South Florida
  • PH.D., University of South Florida

Research Interests

Dr. Altman’s research focuses on questions of the good life, the place of the individual in society, the possibility of authentic existence, and the limitations of morality in determining how we should act. She is co-editor, with Dr. Hans Pedersen, of a book titled Horizons of Authenticity in Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Moral Psychology (Springer, 2014), and she is currently working on a book chapter for the forthcoming Routledge (co-edited) volume on The Kierkegaardian Mind.

Selected Publications

  • Horizons of Authenticity in Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Moral Psychology, edited with an Introduction by Megan Altman and Hans Pedersen (Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer, 2014).
  • “The Struggle for Belonging and Being at Home,” Frontiers of Philosophy in China, Vol. 11 (3) 2016 (special topic issue on “Retrieving Phenomenology,” edited by Eric S. Nelson), 444-462.
  • “Mortality and Morality: A Heideggerian Interpretation of Kierkegaard’s Either/Or,” in Horizons of Authenticity in Phenomenology, Existentialism, and Moral Psychology, ed. Megan Altman and Hans Pedersen (Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer, 2014), 219-237.
  • “Heidegger and Aristotle on Contemplating Contemplation,” in Schreiben Dichten Denken: Zu Heideggers Sprachbegriff, Heidegger Forum Volume 4, ed. David Espinet, series ed. Günter Figal (Frankfurt am Main: Vittorrio Klostermann, 2011), 227-240.
  • “Efficient Action: What Process Ontology Could Learn from Aristotle,” Concrescence: The Australasian Journal of Process Thought, Vol. 10 2009, 25-33.

Additional Links

PDF Icon linked to my CV