Hiram College
Jennifer Clark, Ph.D. Photo

Jennifer Clark, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor of Biology
Co-director Hiram College FrogWatch USA Chapter

Jennifer Clark is an Assistant Professor of Biology specializing in aquatic biology and invertebrate zoology. Her research focuses on how stream fish and macroinvertebrate communities respond to restoration practices and the impacts of human-caused disturbances on the behavior of crayfish. She is passionate about hands-on learning in the field at the James H. Barrow Field Station and directs a wide variety of independent research projects with students. She also enjoys extending citizen science programs to the local community and co-directs Hiram College’s FrogWatch USA chapter. Her favorite courses include Ecology, Insects and Society, and Aquatic Biology.

Education

  • Ph.D., Ecology, Kent State University
  • B.S., Zoology and Pre-medicine, Kent State University

Research Interests

Conversion of land to agriculture and urban development occurs worldwide and streams across the U.S. are restored in an effort to improve stream function/habitat for species. Although, > $1 billion is spent on these projects, few are monitored post-restoration. Jennifer is interested in long-term monitoring of these systems to gauge success in addition to, anthropogenic impacts on native and invasive species, focusing on crayfish.

Selected Publications

  • Clark, J.M. and J.J. Montemarano. Short-term impacts of natural channel design restoration on fish community structure in a fourth-order stream. (Submitted to Water, in review)
  • *Bohls, P.A., *Nelson, M.T., *Cooper, K.N. and J.M. Clark. 2016. Effects of a controlled burn on butterfly diversity in a restored prairie. Ohio Biological Survey Notes 6: 7-13.
  • Clark, J.M. and M.T. Begley. 2015. Fight for Life: A classroom game of foraging, patch selection, and risk. The American Biology Teacher 77: 693-698. DOI: 10.1525/abt.2015.77.9.8.
  • Clark, J.M. and M.W. Kershner. 2013. Habitat-specific effects of particle size, current velocity, water depth, and predation risk on size-dependent crayfish distribution. Hydrobiologia 716: 103-114. DOI 10.1007/s10750-013-1548-z
  • Clark, J.M. and M.W. Kershner. 2011. Short- and long-term impacts of a major flood event on crayfish (Orconectes obscurus) in a forested stream. Fundamental and Applied Limnology 179: 225-233. DOI: 10.1127/1863-9135/2011/0179-0225

*indicates undergraduate co-author

Fun Facts

  • Enjoys birding, camping, hiking, biking, and canoeing
  • Did competitive gymnastics for 12 years
  • Assistant coaches cheerleading at Hiram College

Additional Links

Personal Website   PDF Icon linked to my CV   Sample Syllabus