Centers of Distinction

First at Hiram

"First at Hiram" reflects the individualized education students get when they choose Hiram.

First means students come first.

Students consistently leave Hiram with relationships with faculty and staff that last a lifetime because someone reached out and put their needs first.

First means students can chart a course that’s unique to them.

There’s a real opportunity at Hiram College to be the first to do something, whether that’s start a club, create an individualized major or do research alongside a professor.

First means the opportunity to do things for the first time.

At Hiram College, students become leaders for the first time. They give their first college-level presentation. They complete their first internship. The list goes on.

First is the way Hiram College students stand out.

Because of our small size, students have hands-on opportunities starting their first year, while their peers at other institutions often must wait until their junior or senior year to gain the same opportunities.

First is the opportunity students have to be an individual.

Just like no two students are the same, no two experiences at Hiram College are the same. Students at Hiram are treated as the individuals they are. 

Spotlight of the Week:
Carson Applewhite

“Hiram not only helps me develop as a leader, but they’ve given me tools and the critical thinking skills that help me grow professionally."
Learn more about Carson.

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The Center for Engaged Ethics hosts an annual Campus Day, where students get a day off from classes to perform community service.
In March 2012, the Center for Integrated Entrepreneurship hosted the Entrepreneurship Education Consortium's idealabs 2012 competition. Several area colleges attended.
The Center for Literature and Medicine began a Disease by Performance course for the 2011-2012 academic year, where students wrote a play about autism, and performed it across the state to raise awareness.
The Center for Scientific Engagement regularly conducts research and programming at the James H. Barrow Field Station.
The Garfield Institute for Public Leadership launched a study to gauge the mood of young voters leading up to the 2012 presidential election. Scholar-in-residence Jason Johnson has provided commentary on the study on national media.
The Lindsay-Crane Center for Writing and Literature hosts a Visiting Authors Series each year. In 2012, Thrity Umrigar, author of "The Space Between Us" gave a convocation and book signing on campus.
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